Adults With Developmental Disabilities Jobs

These are the top 20 resources and video content I found about adults with developmental disabilities jobs. I've created this page to highlight the most recently updated (and useful!) resources for "adults with developmental disabilities jobs". This guide was updated: 2022-05-20. If you are searching for a job, good luck on the hunt!
~ Scott from Sumry.me

Top 4 Resources

  • Adult Developmental Disability Jobs, Employment

    Adult Developmental Disability Jobs, Employment

    22,718 Adult Developmental Disability jobs available on Indeed.com. Apply to Direct Support Professional, Community Service Officer, Executive and more! Read More...

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  • Adults With Developmental Disabilities Jobs, Employment

    Adults With Developmental Disabilities Jobs, Employment

    23,449 Adults With Developmental Disabilities jobs available on Indeed.com. Apply to Case Manager, Rehabilitation Specialist, Executive and more! Read More...

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  • Adults With Developmental Disabilities Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com

    Adults With Developmental Disabilities Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com

    34,696 Adults With Developmental Disabilities jobs available on Indeed.com. Apply to Coach, Disability Support Worker, Program Manager and more! Read More...

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Top 5-20 Resources

  • 8 Job Ideas for Adults with Special Needs | HCBS | Home Community Based Services

    8 Job Ideas for Adults with Special Needs | HCBS | Home Community Based Services

    As a parent of an adult child with special needs, it’s always encouraging to see adults with special needs being hired by employers. Many employers are leaving behind a lot of the stereotypes surrounding people with physical and intellectual disabilities and realizing that many of the special needs employees they work with are the most hard-working and dedicated employees theyRead More ... Read More...

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  • Employment

    Employment

    Statement People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD)* can be employed in the community alongside people without disabilities and earn competitive wages. They should be supported to make informed choices about their work and careers and have the resources to seek, obtain, and be successful in community employment. Issue Historically, the majority of people with IDD have been either unemployed or underemployed despite their ability, desire, and willingness to work in the community. Many have been placed in “prevocational” programs and “disability-only” workshops where they are paid below minimum wage and have little expectation of moving into jobs where they work alongside people without disabilities. People often leave school with little community-based vocational experience or planning for transition from school to work or post-secondary education. Adult service agencies have struggled to move people into the workforce using personnel who often do not have proper training in best practices for either finding or supporting people in jobs. When employed, few people have opportunities to advance, explore new possibilities, or, in their later years, retire. Barriers to employment include, first and foremost, low societal expectations that foster job discrimination. In addition, unrealistically low limits on assets and earnings make people fear losing vital public benefits if they work too many hours or earn too much. Systemically, public resources fund service hours rather than outcomes and are often neither sufficient nor flexible enough to allow collaboration and blending of employment funding streams. Lack of other services like transportation or of accommodations like assistive technology can also hinder success. PostionPeople with IDD should have the supports necessary from individuals and systems to enable them to find and keep community jobs based on their preferences, interests, and strengths, work alongside people without disabilities, receive comparable wages, and be free from workplace discrimination. Requirements related to employment include: • Opportunities for post-secondary education, including college and vocational training, to gain knowledge and skills to allow people to get better jobs. • Ongoing planning to promote job advancement and career development. • Fair and reasonable wages and benefits. • Opportunities for self-employment and business ownership. • Opportunities to work with and, in the case of people with IDD who own small businesses, employ people without disabilities. • The ability to explore new directions over time and, at the appropriate time, retire. • Opportunities to work and increase earnings and assets without losing eligibility for needed public benefits. Best Practices • Employment supports and services should use best practices, including assessing skills and interests, working with employers, matching jobs to skill sets and employer needs, providing individualized and ongoing job supports, designing reasonable job accommodations, integrating people into the workforce, building social skills necessary in the workplace, and securing necessary ancillary services such as transportation. • People with IDD must have training and information on how to access supports needed to find and keep jobs. School-to-Work Transition • Transition planning should start early. • Transition activities should foster individualized exploration of and experiences with community-based employment options that enable youth to make informed choices. • Transition activities should include career assessments to identify students’ interests and preferences, exposure to post-secondary education and career opportunities, training to develop job-seeking and workplace skills, and participation in multiple on-the-job activities and experiences in paid and unpaid settings. Transition activities should not be limited to unpaid internships at pre-set community worksites. • Students should leave high school with opportunities to pursue post-secondary education and/or with an appropriate job or an action plan for finding one. Training of Staff and People with IDD• Staff of employment and school-to-work transition programs must receive training in best practices to help people find and keep jobs. • Along with ensuring appropriate on-the-job training, people with IDD should receive guidance, if needed, in acquiring the social skills necessary in the workplace. • People with IDD must have training, including, if desired, driver’s education, to allow them to travel in the community so they can get to jobs and enhance their independence. Systems For all people with IDD, publicly funded employment programs should first explore employment alongside people without disabilities at comparable wages, with comparable benefits, before considering other options in the community. Ancillary services like transportation and accommodations like assistive technology must be available to individuals and support agencies. Public policy should encourage employers to hire people with IDD. Publicly funded employment programs should also: • Be available to all people with IDD who wish to explore opportunities to work, regardless of the nature and extent of their disabilities. • Enable people to make informed choices by providing individualized exploration of and experiences with community-based employment and by presenting all information needed to make informed choices in an understandable way. • Provide sufficient resources to support people to work in the community and be flexible enough to foster collaboration and braiding of employment-related funds. • Build infrastructure and supports needed to phase out the issuance of subminimum wage certificates, increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment, and put in place safeguards to protect the interests of any people affected by this shift. • Measure and publicly report on outcomes on an ongoing basis. Adopted:       Board of Directors, AAIDD September 19, 2012 Board of Directors, The Arc  July 29, 2012  Congress of Delegates, The Arc October 27, 2012 Reviewed and extended without revision, 2017 *“ Intellectual Disability (ID) is a lifelong condition where significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior emerge during the developmental period (before adulthood). Developmental Disabilities (DD), first defined in 1975 federal legislation now known as “The DD Act,”, are a group of lifelong conditions that emerge during the developmental period and result in some level of functional limitation in learning, language, communication, cognition, behavior, socialization, or mobility. The most common DD conditions are intellectual disability, Down syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, fetal alcohol syndrome, and fragile X syndrome. The acronym “IDD” is used to describe a group that includes either people with both ID and another DD or a group that includes people with ID or another DD. The supports that people with IDD need to meet their goals vary in intensity from intermittent to pervasive. Read More...

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  • Keys to Unlocking Employment Opportunities for Adults with Disabilities

    Keys to Unlocking Employment Opportunities for Adults with Disabilities

    Finding employment today for anyone can be a challenge, but finding employment opportunities for adults with disabilities in the Long Island area can be filled with uncertainty — especially if you don't know where to look. Community Mainstreaming can help. Read our top tips for finding employment opportunities for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Read More...

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  • Employment, Training, and Wages for People With Disabilities

    Employment, Training, and Wages for People With Disabilities

    People with intellectual and developmental disabilities can be employed in the community alongside people without disabilities and earn competitive wages. Read More...

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  • The Best Jobs for People with Developmental Disabilities

    The Best Jobs for People with Developmental Disabilities

    Finding jobs for people with developmental disabilities in Arkansas is easier with today’s programs, resources, and community support. Read More...

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  • What Jobs Are Appropriate for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities?

    What Jobs Are Appropriate for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities?

    What Jobs Are Appropriate for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities?. Developmental disabilities appear in children and youths before they reach the age of 22 and likely will continue throughout their lives, according to the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000. By then, medical ... Read More...

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  • Super Awesome Resource

    Super Awesome Resource

    We do not have a summary for this resource, it is likely a handy PDF or Word document! Read More...

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  • Career Program for Adults w/ Disabilities | Aspire Chicago

    Career Program for Adults w/ Disabilities | Aspire Chicago

    Discover how Aspire's Careers Program teaches and trains adults with autism and other disabilities to help get hired at their dream job. Read More...

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  • Super Awesome Resource

    Super Awesome Resource

    We do not have a summary for this resource, it is likely a handy PDF or Word document! Read More...

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  • Find remote work from home & flexible jobs with Adults with Developmental Disabilities - ADD. Discover a better job search with FlexJobs today! Read More...

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  • $30k-$89k Intellectual Disability Jobs (NOW HIRING) | ZipRecruiter

    $30k-$89k Intellectual Disability Jobs (NOW HIRING) | ZipRecruiter

    Browse 149,425 INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY job ($30K-$89K) listings hiring now from companies with openings. Find your next job opportunity near you & 1-Click Apply! Read More...

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  • We do not have a summary for this resource, it is likely a handy PDF or Word document! Read More...

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  • Jobs and Education for People with Disabilities | USAGov

    Jobs and Education for People with Disabilities | USAGov

    Learn about employment resources on how to find a government job and prepare for a job interview. You can also find information on employment laws and how to file a workplace harassment or discrimination complaint. Also, search educational programs for students with disabilities. Read More...

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  • Careers, Employment & Jobs for People with Disabilities | Navigate Life Texas

    Careers, Employment & Jobs for People with Disabilities | Navigate Life Texas

    With the right support, there are careers available for people with disabilities. Read More...

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  • ThinkWork: Advancing employment and opportunity for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities | Think Work

    ThinkWork: Advancing employment and opportunity for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities | Think Work

    People who work in or manage agencies that provide employment supports Read More...

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  • Disabilities employment programs Archives - Ontario Caregiver Organization

    Disabilities employment programs Archives - Ontario Caregiver Organization

    Employment, education and training services focusing on the needs of adults with developmental and physical disabilities. Read More...

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  • Cuyahoga County Board of Developmental Disabilities

    Cuyahoga County Board of Developmental Disabilities

    The Cuyahoga DD recruits and retains outstanding individuals who are committed to our mission of supporting and empowering people with developmental disabilities to live, learn, work and play in the community. Read More...

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